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Nannerl Keohane, who chaired the Princeton steering committee, wrote in an e-mail interview that "the climate was different in the late 1990s and the past decade." And she linked the findings to shifts in popular culture such as "the receding of second-wave feminist excitement and commitment, a backlash in some quarters, a re-orientation of young women's expectations based on what they had seen of their mothers' generation, a profound reorientation of popular culture which now glorifies sexy babes consistently, rather than sometimes showing an accomplished woman without foregrounding her sexuality."This "sexy babes" trend is a big one."For young women, what has replaced the feminine mystique is the hottie mystique," Ms. "Girls no longer feel that there is anything they must not do or cannot do because they're female, but they hold increasingly strong beliefs that if you are going to attempt these other things, you need to look and be sexually hot."In television shows, for instance, women are represented in far more diverse roles – they are lawyers, doctors, politicians. A woman might run for high political office, but there is almost always analysis about whether she is sexy, too.

In 2010, the APA released a report on the sexualization of girls, which it described as portraying a girl's value as coming primarily from her sexual appeal.

She sat on the front step quietly – waiting, she said, for her prince.

She seemed less imaginative, less spunky, less interested in the world. Finucane believes the shift began when Caoimhe (pronounced Keeva) discovered the Disney Princesses, that omnipresent, pastel packaged franchise of slender-waisted fairy-tale heroines.

[L]ittle girls experience the fantasy and imagination provided by these stories as a normal part of their childhood development."And yet, the Finucane and Orenstein critique does resonate with many familiar with modern American girlhood as "hot" replaces pretty in pink, and getting the prince takes on a more ominous tone.

Parents and educators regularly tell re-searchers that they are unable to control the growing onslaught of social messages shaping their daughters and students."Parents are having a really hard time dealing with it," says Diane Levin, an early childhood specialist at Wheelock College in Boston who recently co-wrote the book "So Sexy So Soon." "They say that things they used to do aren't working; they say they're losing control of what happens to their girls at younger and younger ages."It only takes a glance at some recent studies to understand why parents are uneasy:•A University of Central Florida poll found that 50 percent of 3-to-6-year-old girls worry that they are fat.•One-quarter of 14-to-17-year-olds of both sexes polled by The Associated Press and MTV in 2009 reported either sending naked pictures of themselves or receiving naked pictures of someone else.•The marketing group NPD Fashionworld reported in 2003 that more than

Nannerl Keohane, who chaired the Princeton steering committee, wrote in an e-mail interview that "the climate was different in the late 1990s and the past decade." And she linked the findings to shifts in popular culture such as "the receding of second-wave feminist excitement and commitment, a backlash in some quarters, a re-orientation of young women's expectations based on what they had seen of their mothers' generation, a profound reorientation of popular culture which now glorifies sexy babes consistently, rather than sometimes showing an accomplished woman without foregrounding her sexuality."This "sexy babes" trend is a big one."For young women, what has replaced the feminine mystique is the hottie mystique," Ms. "Girls no longer feel that there is anything they must not do or cannot do because they're female, but they hold increasingly strong beliefs that if you are going to attempt these other things, you need to look and be sexually hot."In television shows, for instance, women are represented in far more diverse roles – they are lawyers, doctors, politicians. A woman might run for high political office, but there is almost always analysis about whether she is sexy, too.In 2010, the APA released a report on the sexualization of girls, which it described as portraying a girl's value as coming primarily from her sexual appeal.

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Nannerl Keohane, who chaired the Princeton steering committee, wrote in an e-mail interview that "the climate was different in the late 1990s and the past decade." And she linked the findings to shifts in popular culture such as "the receding of second-wave feminist excitement and commitment, a backlash in some quarters, a re-orientation of young women's expectations based on what they had seen of their mothers' generation, a profound reorientation of popular culture which now glorifies sexy babes consistently, rather than sometimes showing an accomplished woman without foregrounding her sexuality."This "sexy babes" trend is a big one."For young women, what has replaced the feminine mystique is the hottie mystique," Ms. "Girls no longer feel that there is anything they must not do or cannot do because they're female, but they hold increasingly strong beliefs that if you are going to attempt these other things, you need to look and be sexually hot."In television shows, for instance, women are represented in far more diverse roles – they are lawyers, doctors, politicians. A woman might run for high political office, but there is almost always analysis about whether she is sexy, too.

In 2010, the APA released a report on the sexualization of girls, which it described as portraying a girl's value as coming primarily from her sexual appeal.

She sat on the front step quietly – waiting, she said, for her prince.

She seemed less imaginative, less spunky, less interested in the world. Finucane believes the shift began when Caoimhe (pronounced Keeva) discovered the Disney Princesses, that omnipresent, pastel packaged franchise of slender-waisted fairy-tale heroines.

[L]ittle girls experience the fantasy and imagination provided by these stories as a normal part of their childhood development."And yet, the Finucane and Orenstein critique does resonate with many familiar with modern American girlhood as "hot" replaces pretty in pink, and getting the prince takes on a more ominous tone.

Parents and educators regularly tell re-searchers that they are unable to control the growing onslaught of social messages shaping their daughters and students."Parents are having a really hard time dealing with it," says Diane Levin, an early childhood specialist at Wheelock College in Boston who recently co-wrote the book "So Sexy So Soon." "They say that things they used to do aren't working; they say they're losing control of what happens to their girls at younger and younger ages."It only takes a glance at some recent studies to understand why parents are uneasy:•A University of Central Florida poll found that 50 percent of 3-to-6-year-old girls worry that they are fat.•One-quarter of 14-to-17-year-olds of both sexes polled by The Associated Press and MTV in 2009 reported either sending naked pictures of themselves or receiving naked pictures of someone else.•The marketing group NPD Fashionworld reported in 2003 that more than $1.6 million is spent annually on thong underwear for 7-to-12-year-olds.•Children often come across Internet pornography unintentionally: University of New Hampshire researchers found in 2005 that one-third of Internet users ages 10 to 17 were exposed to unwanted sexual material, and a London School of Economics study in 2004 found that 60 percent of children who use the Internet regularly come into contact with pornography. It's enough, really, to alarm the most relaxed parent.

Even those young women – and experts say there are growing numbers of them – who claim that it is empowering to be a sex object often suffer the ill effects of sexualization."The sexualization of girls may not only reflect sexist attitudes, a society tolerant of sexual violence, and the exploitation of girls and women but may also contribute to these phenomena," the APA said. It's easy for it to get by us."Help girls to see the problem So what to do?

.6 million is spent annually on thong underwear for 7-to-12-year-olds.•Children often come across Internet pornography unintentionally: University of New Hampshire researchers found in 2005 that one-third of Internet users ages 10 to 17 were exposed to unwanted sexual material, and a London School of Economics study in 2004 found that 60 percent of children who use the Internet regularly come into contact with pornography. It's enough, really, to alarm the most relaxed parent.

Even those young women – and experts say there are growing numbers of them – who claim that it is empowering to be a sex object often suffer the ill effects of sexualization."The sexualization of girls may not only reflect sexist attitudes, a society tolerant of sexual violence, and the exploitation of girls and women but may also contribute to these phenomena," the APA said. It's easy for it to get by us."Help girls to see the problem So what to do?

But, she adds, they start to drop out of sports at the middle school level when they start to believe that sports are unfeminine and unsexy.Sweater wearers far outperformed the scantily dressed.Research also connects sexualization to eating disorders, depression, and physical health problems.She came to believe that the billion Disney Princess empire was the first step down a path to scarier challenges, from self-objectification to cyberbullying to unhealthy body images.Finucane, who has a background in play therapy, started a blog – "Disney Princess Recovery: Bringing Sexy Back for a Full Refund" – to chronicle her efforts to break the grip of Cinderella, Belle, Ariel, et al. Within months she had thousands of followers."It was validating, in a sense, that a lot of parents were experiencing it," she says."It was this big force entering our lives so early, with such strength.It concerned me for what was down the road."Finucane's theory about Disney Princesses is by no means universal.The Women's Sports Foundation found that 6 girls drop out of sports for every 1 boy by the end of high school, and a recent Girl Scout study found that 23 percent of girls between the ages of 11 and 17 do not play sports because they do not think their bodies look good doing so. Lamb says, is increasingly tied to what it means to play.Star female athletes regularly pose naked or seminaked for men's magazines; girls see cheerleaders (with increasingly sexualized routines) on TV far more than they see female basketball players or other athletes. Earlier this year, a Princeton University study found a growing leadership gap among male and female undergraduates.Soccer heading makes a bad hair day The first step, some say, is to understand why any of this matters. According to the Washington-based Center on Education Policy, high school girls perform as well as boys on math and science tests and do better than their male peers in reading.Three women now graduate from college for every 2 men.

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